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Escapee accused of trying to carjack charter school parent

By Jill Kuramoto
Published On: Feb 21 2013 12:00:00 AM HST
Updated On: Feb 22 2013 09:22:04 AM HST

It was business as usual on the campus where escaped inmate Teddy Munet allegedly tried to carjack a parent.

HONOLULU -

It was business as usual Thursday on the campus where escaped inmate Teddy Munet allegedly tried to carjack a parent.

“I’m fine for me.  OK.  The kids were safe,” said Donna Wolford, as she was walking her daughter to school Thursday morning.

Wolford echoed how most parents at Voyager Public Charter School were feeling, a day after the school was essentially the start of a massive manhunt for an escaped accused murderer.

“I was so worried.  I heard it on the radio.  I was at work at Sand Island.  I was like, God, what am I going to do?” said Erwin Miller, whose 9-year-old son is a student at Voyager.

Miller said he knew his son was safe at school, but it didn't stop the anxiety.

“I was worried all day for my son here,” Miller said.

Principal Mary Beth Barr said she only learned of the escape when Teddy Munet allegedly tried to carjack one of the parents in the school's parking lot.

“We got the call that there had been an attempted carjacking in the parking lot.  So I went down to greet the police and find out as much as I could,” said Barr. “As soon as I talked to the police, we went into lockdown.”

On Thursday, she was greeting families with a smile and praising students and staff for how well they handled the all-day lockdown.

“We have practiced that and so it went very smoothly. The teachers were very prepared and the kids did exactly as they were told,” said Barr.

Student Jamie Ana said she was scared. “Yeah, a little bit,” said Ana.

“Nobody was hurt and the police, I think, their handling of it was exceptional. They were down here all day long so we felt really safe,” said Barr.

But parents are voicing concerns over the transfer procedures at the courthouse across the street.

“They just have to come up with a better solution.  Why did that prisoner escape?” said Wolford.

“I was trying to listen to the radio, look on line to see what was going on and it seemed like all the information came pretty late,” said parent Corey Shibata.

For today though, it was business as usual -- with a little extra outdoor time.

“I asked the teachers to give the kids a few minutes extra recess because they were cooped up all day yesterday,” said Barr.

Voyager Public Charter School was one of more than a dozen public and private schools on lockdown or "high-alert" during Wednesday's manhunt.

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