Dozens gather for Kamehameha Day celebration

By Cam Tran
Published On: Jun 11 2014 06:35:44 PM HST
Updated On: Jun 11 2014 08:10:25 PM HST

The Daughters and Sons of Hawaiian Warriors Mamakakaua hosted the ceremony at the King Kamehameha statue in front of Aliiolani Hale Wednesday morning.

HONOLULU -

Dozens attended a ceremony Wednesday morning to mark Kamehameha Day at the king's statue.

Click here to watch Cam Tran's story.

The goal was not just to remember the king, but to make sure his legacy stays alive.

Through mele and oli, royal societies, civic groups and onlookers pay their respects to King Kamehameha the Great, who united the Hawaiian islands.

"I think it's important to know where we came from," said Nani Mahoe, of 'Ahahui Ka'ahumanu. "And having that trend and knowing where our roots are and, more importantly, now to keep alive that spirit and the example he gave to us."

The Daughters and Sons of Hawaiian Warriors Mamakakaua hosted the ceremony at the King Kamehameha statue in front of Ali'iolani Hale Wednesday morning.

Each of the royal orders came together and presented a gift to pay homage to the great ali'i.

"Items like the mele and oli that was recounted explains the life of the lineage and importance of King Kamehameha the Great," said Keali'i McClellan, with the Daughters and Sons of Hawaiian Warrios Mamakakaua.

Some of the oli that were offered to Kamehameha also commemorate different parts of his life and different achievements.

For the last 100 years, the descendants of Hawaiian royalty have come together to make sure the king's legacy and accomplishments throughout Hawaiian history are never forgotten.

It especially rings true to those like Keali'i who has family lineage to the king.

"It is a great honor to be part of this. It is an honor to be part of my family who has left me this lineage and provided me the teachings and the history and to be involved with such an organization," McClellan said.

Though the ceremony was brief, the point was to make sure everyone in Hawaii takes a moment, no matter how short, to remember the true meaning of the holiday.

"All of us celebrate Kamehameha Day in many ways. Some will go to the picnic and go to the beach, but how many of us remember this great chief," asked Hailana Farden, with the Daughters and Sons of Hawaiian Warriors Mamakakaua.

PHOTOS: Kamehameha statue lei draping 2014

Click here for photos from the King Kamehameha statue lei draping.

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