Families scramble to deal with shutdown

By Catherine Cruz
Published On: Oct 01 2013 06:14:00 PM HST

Families of military personnel flocked to the commissary after hearing it will close until further notice, and civilian workers at all bases across the state reported to work to get the official word about the shutdown.

HONOLULU -

Families flocked to the Pearl City and Kaneohe commissary on hearing it was to shut down after Tuesday, until further notice.

"It's pretty stressful because we are dependents. It's hard. We have to stock up on our groceries.  We probably spent about $300 because we don’t know when it will be open again," said Mikyla Young.

Civilian workers at all bases across the state from Pearl Harbor, to Schofield Barracks, Wheeler and Kaneohe reported to work to get the official word about the shutdown.

The spouse of a civilian hazmat worker at Tripler who was angry at the prospect of being forced to survive on one income, lashed out.

"I don’t think Congress should be paid if over 800,000 employees are not going to be paid. I think Congress is very inept at this moment. They need to do a better job of helping people of the United States,” said Jean Davis.

By noon Tuesday, close to 1,000 federal technicians - referred to as the backbone of the Hawaii National Guard - were sent home.

A couple hundred active duty and reserve officers remained on the job, disheartened.

"There are a number of people men and women in the army who wear the uniform Monday through Friday. They are full-time members of the National Guard but technically they are DOD civilians and they were all furloughed," said Lt. Col Chuck Anthony.

Government shutdown to interrupt military commissary service

Click here to see photos from the commissary at Marine Corps Base Hawaii at Kaneohe Bay.

Anthony said without the necessary support staff, it was likely that upcoming drills would be postponed.

The effect would be far reaching as posts from Diamond Head to Kalaeloa and the neighbor islands would be idled.

"This a terrible hardships for federal technicians. They already had to deal with the furloughs with sequestration, and many of  them are combat veterans,” Anthony said.

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