Man climbs Koko Crater backwards every week

By Yunji de Nies
Published On: Nov 19 2013 06:45:00 PM HST

Koko Crater is one of those hikes that for a lot of folks is simply addictive.  One man does the trail backwards.  Click here to read the story.

HONOLULU -

Every Saturday morning, on those dusty railway ties at Koko Head Crater, you can find him -- Shadrack Anderson.  Most here know him as the backwards running man.

Click here to watch Yunji de Nies' report.

"It keeps me out of the norm," said Anderson.  "So therefore, I can feel almost immortal."

Perhaps not immortal, but on this trail, certainly well-known.

"Pretty impressive.  I've never seen anybody do anything like that before," said visitor Bret Colton.

He's so good, this vertical climb is the end of his morning.  He starts before sunrise running backwards from Koko Head District park to the Makapu'u Lighthouse and back -- a half marathon.  Then, Koko Crater in reverse!

"It's the ultimate workout after a long run," said Anderson.

Get this -- he does that ultimate workout climbing all the way up... twice!

The 66 year old says nothing beats this feeling.  He says it's helped his body, his mind and more.

"My hearing is like a radar, so all of my senses are increased, you know," said Anderson.  "In 46 years, I have stumbled six times, but I think that's a pretty damn good record.  I said stumbled, not fallen."

Anderson says each step is going to be different every time and he develops a rhythm.  It's not easy.

"You're thinking accuracy, surefootedness, land on solid ground, not on solid wood," said Anderson.

At the top, taking in that view, he explains, is why he does it.

"Some people pray, some people meditate for clarity, you know.  If you do what I do, you get clarity because you don't have time to think," said Anderson.  "I'm in heaven.  I'm in heaven, you know.  I don't have to wait to get there."

He's done that full routine, half marathon and the mountain twice every Saturday for the last 10 years and, quite simply, he's hooked.

"It takes me to a plateau that will take me for another decade, and then I'll find another one.  I'll find a higher mountain," said Anderson.

Anderson is working on a performance art piece to share the joys of backwards running with folks who can't always make it to the trail.

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